Waste management tips for business

By encouraging reuse, recycling and resource recovery in your business, you can reduce the amount of waste that ends up in landfill. Reducing your business’s waste can save you money, and benefit the environment.

fde4

Steps to develop a better waste management plan for your business

Follow these steps to effectively manage waste in your business:

Step 1 – Measure business waste

For a quick visual waste assessment, go around to all the bins presented for collection just before the collection truck arrives and see how full they are. Don’t worry if there are different sized bins; simply note down the sizes, an estimate of how full they are, and how often waste is collected.

For example, there might be a standard domestic 240L wheelie bin that is 50% full and collected once a week, equalling 120L of waste per week. Use the bin conversion chart (PDF, 596KB) to help determine the size of bins.

Once you have collated this information, you will know how much waste material your business produces within a given time frame.

Step 2 – Reduce waste going to landfill

Identify options to:

  • Reduce – can waste be avoided or reduced by the way

The Manufacturing Warehouse 5 Material Handling Tips To Make It More Efficient

21eAXD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How well materials are handled in your warehouse makes a large difference in efficient operations and profits. Poorly organized products, too little or too much inventory, wrong shipments and over-handling all cut into profitability. Below are top material-handling ideas to make your manufacturing warehouse more efficient.

1.  Start right from the beginning

When materials come in, or are completed from the shop floor, take care of the inventory and stocking process in one complete step. The more times an item is handled, the more it costs you. Barcodes, scanners or RFID technology will greatly reduce the time spent updating inventory. As a piece of material is moved from receiving or the shop floor, it can immediately be entered into a database.

The same technology can tell your personnel where the material needs to be placed in stock. Even with the use of technology, your bin or shelving systems should be clearly labeled for identification. This will speed up the stocking process and help reduce errors.

2.  Organization

How your warehouse is organized really is critical in how efficiently it operates. The way you organize it is your choice — choose the method that works best for you. You might want to

Public Relations Tips and Tricks for Your Business

Creating an efficient PR and marketing plan is a cornerstone to building up your organization’s success. Marketing and PR, unfortunately, sometimes can be costly, particularly if you’re running a lean operation and just starting out.

3dwqd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creating an efficient PR and marketing plan is a cornerstone to building up your organization’s success. Marketing and PR, unfortunately, sometimes can be costly, particularly if you’re running a lean operation and just starting out. Thankfully, there will include a few affordable PR and marketing tips and tricks which may offer your small business a cost-effective way to successfully increase sales and grow your consumer base.

You may have an excellent service or product, yet if nobody has knowledge of it, generating sales might be difficult. Effective public relations and marketing include proactive methods for you to spread the message to your market and attract potential customers and clients.

Marketing is about discovering methods of reaching your targeted audience–these potential customers and clients who possess an interest in and possible necessity for what you are selling. Public relations includes obtaining positive press and publicity in regard to your business concerning its

6 Business Development Tips for Professional Services

When it comes to business development for professional services, one of the biggest challenges professionals face is finding time to do it all. After all, you don’t sell full-time. Your work, whether it’s consulting, accounting, or engineering, is what you do full-time. And that makes it very difficult to find time to create and develop the relationships necessary to bring in new business.

There simply are not enough hours in the day to do it all.

As a result, business development activities are unplanned and inconsistent, which leads to limited touches and prospects slipping through the cracks due to lack of follow-up.

While I cannot create more hours in the day, I can give you some business development tips that will help you become more effective with the balancing act of selling and doing.

6 Business Development Tips
  1. Do a Little Bit Every Day

The excuses for not selling are plentiful: I was busy delivering, I had to run a report, a meeting went long, and the list goes on. There is always something else. To be successful, you must make business development a priority, and you can start by setting aside a little bit of time every day to focus on your sales efforts.

Mornings tend

10 Business Development Techniques to Grow Sales Fast

Time to crank up sales. Thankfully, the economy is starting to heat up, and as such, it may be an ideal time to learn how to crank up your sales.

For a little guidance, I give you 10 lessons from John Whitehead, the fabulously successful former chairman of Goldman Sachs. Besides climbing to the top of the corporate ladder and making billons for his firm, Whitehead stormed the beach at Normandy on D-Day. We should memorize his pearls of wisdom:

  1. Don’t waste your time going after business you don’t really want.

We hired a mechanical engineer from West Point this month to help us grow sales. His focus is to help manufacturing engineers in industrial S&P 500 companies understand why Marlin Steel, my company, is better than our competitors. Why? Our clients are not marketing companies, nor are they point of purchase display companies. These folks don’t appreciate quality and engineering. Instead, they are looking for the lowest price. Make sure you point your sales and marketing team in the right direction for profitable business.

  1. The boss usually decides–not the assistant treasurer (or the intern).

Selling to the right person, the decision maker, is critical. Many times engineering interns will reach out to

8 Financial Management Tips for Small Business Owners

Running a small business is never easy. It seems that there are an endless stream of problems to deal with and administrative tasks to be taken care of. However, there is a way through the fog that can descend over business owners who feel like they do not know which way is up.

What can be especially difficult is keeping a tight rein on the financial side of things. Often business owners lack the experience with accounts, having never worked in an accounting firm before and so make many rudimentary mistakes along the way.

Here we outline some financial management tips to help small business owners navigate the tricky financial waters so their businesses can thrive:

#1. Create a Realistic Budget

Financial budgets within a business are often treated like a chore and an unnecessary piece of paperwork to handle. This is not the case at all. Just like with a business plan that is only good on paper until the business gets off the ground, a budget at least lays out what the financial plan is moving forward.

It acts as a guiding hand rather than locking the owner into certain decisions ahead of time. A budget can also indicate more clearly whether projected

Agriculture Classes and Courses Overview

Agriculture classes prepare students for a variety of careers, including ranching, farming, agriculture science or horticulture management. Agriculture courses are found in associate’s, bachelor’s and graduate degree programs, and students learn everything from horticulture basics to how to run a farming business. Read on to get details on what students typically learn in common agriculture classes.

Essential Information

Though many agricultural workers who work directly on a farm or ranch learn their skills through on-the-job training, undergraduate agriculture programs can prepare students for more advanced positions, such as agricultural and food science technician. These programs can include internships that provide hands-on training and often have a high concentration of courses that focus on the biological sciences. Careers in management or as agricultural scientists require more specialized training that is usually found in graduate-level programs. These programs often include lab work and focus on original research.

Here is an outline of common concepts taught in agriculture courses:

  • Agribusiness
  • Agricultural Science
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Agriculture Education
  • Agricultural Resource Management

List of Courses

Natural Resources

A natural resources course covers topics pertaining to forestry, soils and wildlife. Students learn about power sources, such as electric motors and combustion engines, as well as government regulations and programs that relate to natural resource conservation. The effects that

Agriculture Degrees by Degree Program Level

Students interested in entering the agricultural industry might consider applying to an agriculture degree program, where they are taught foundational agricultural business operations as well as how to operate machinery used in the farming industry.

 

Essential Information

Prospective students of agriculture might consider programs at the associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels, according to their previous education. Agriculture-related bachelor’s degree programs, which take four years to complete, are excellent introductions to the field. By earning a master’s degree in agriculture, crop and soil scientists can prepare to conduct relevant research or teach agricultural topics.

Through advanced international agribusiness and market forecasting coursework and a dissertation, Doctor of Philosophy in Agricultural Economics programs prepare students for careers as university professors and top-level business executives.

  • Program Levels: Associate’s degrees, bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees, Ph.D. degrees
  • Prerequisites: Associate’s degree programs require a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; bachelor’s degree programs require a high school diploma and a strong background in math; master’s degree programs often require excellent grades, high GRE test scores and a bachelor’s degree; doctoral degree programs require students to have completed advanced math and science coursework as well as to present their GRE test scores to be considered for admission.
  • Program Specializations: Doctoral degree students

Agricultural and Applied Economics

Are you interested in the problems of global poverty and hunger? Are you concerned about wetlands, industrial pollution, global climate change, and the survival of endangered species? Are you curious about the effects of globalization on the American economy? Have you traveled overseas and been fascinated by how other countries organize their food system? Do you wonder whether bio-fuels are the answer to rising gas prices? Are you intrigued with the issues of genetically modified foods versus organic foods? Would you like to pursue a degree in law, perhaps specializing in environmental, business, or international law? Are you interested in getting an MBA?

A program of study in applied economics will open many doors to an exciting and rewarding future—your future. It will introduce you to some of the following topics

  • The economics of the domestic and international food system
  • Global markets and international trade
  • The economics of sustainability and development
  • Analytical tools for business forecasting
  • Environmental economics and public policy
  • Economic growth and development in low-income countries
  • Production economics, technology, and the economics of the life sciences
  • Managerial economics and markets

Agricultural and Applied Economics

There are four concentrations within the major, all leading to the Bachelor of Science degree.

  • Applied Economics
  • Development Economics
  • Environmental Economics
  • Managerial Economics

Agricultural Business Management

If you are particularly interested in

Agricultural Business Management

Are you interested in the problems of global poverty and hunger? Is your goal a career in international business? Are you curious about the effects of globalization on the American economy? Are you concerned about wetlands, industrial pollution, global climate change, and the survival of endangered species? Have you traveled overseas and been fascinated by how other countries organize their food system? Do you wonder whether bio-fuels are the answer to rising gas prices? Are you intrigued with the issues of genetically modified foods versus organic foods? Would you like to pursue a degree in law, perhaps specializing in environmental, business, or international law? Are you interested in getting an MBA?

A program of study in applied economics will open many doors to an exciting and rewarding future—your future. It will introduce you to some of the following topics

  • The economics of the domestic and international food system
  • Global markets and international trade
  • The economics of sustainability and development
  • Analytical tools for business forecasting
  • Environmental economics and public policy
  • Economic growth and development in low-income countries
  • Production economics, technology, and the economics of the life sciences
  • Managerial economics and markets

Agricultural and Applied Economics

There are four concentrations within the major, all leading to the Bachelor of Science degree.

  • Applied Economics
  • Development Economics
  • Environmental

Agricultural Business Manager Job Description and Career Info

Learn about a career as an agricultural business manager. Read the job description, duties, education requirements, salary and employment outlook to decide if this is the right career for you.

Job Description

Agricultural business managers oversee the business operations of a farm by providing leadership and organization during the production process. From contacting creditors to selecting seeds for the planting season and buying new farming equipment, it is their responsibility to ensure that the production and distribution of produce, grain or livestock abides by government and environmental regulations at the best rate of profit. They may have a number of duties, including selecting and supervising workers, planning a budget, organizing routine maintenance, keeping records and communicating with potential product buyers. Agricultural business managers usually specialize in crops, horticulture or livestock, and these workers may oversee more than one facility.

Most agricultural business managers are employed full time and work long hours during the planting and harvesting seasons. They may conduct administrative tasks in an office and spend the rest of their time directing activities on the farm. Managers who work for large operations may travel to handle business with farmers or farm supervisors.

Educational Requirements

Many agricultural business managers begin their training with hands-on experience

Agricultural Business

The Agricultural Business major teaches students the operating techniques and business skills used in the modern food and fiber industry. This program builds student knowledge and skills needed to manage small and medium sized business in agriculture and allied industries. This is true whether the business is directly involved in production, value-adds to raw agricultural products, or provides support services including the distribution, processing, packaging, and marketing of agricultural products.

Two things tend to distinguish the major in Agricultural Business from a typical business degree: first, our focus tends to be on small and medium sized businesses where the decision maker must be more attuned to all dimensions of their operating environment, whereas more traditional business degrees often focus on a larger business organization where functions are more specialized. Second, the major emphasizes the importance of understanding the underlying technical processes that drive business decisions through formal course requirements in the agricultural sciences. The interface between technical training in agricultural sciences, economics, and management sets this degree apart.

Completing this program enhances students’ professional development, technical competence, problem solving skills and communication skills. The program operates in the nexus of business management, public policy, and agriculture. Strong interdisciplinary coordination in the department

Travel agency business

Do you feel your company is threatened by changes that are happening in your industry right now or could be in the near future?  This can be a bad thing – but you might be able to turn the threat into an opportunity, as well.

To begin, threats can exist for many reasons, but the most strategic threats occur because something in your value stream is undergoing a fundamental change.  The best examples, in recent years, have been changes brought about by technology, such as the impact of online travel websites on the travel agency business, or the impact of the cell phone on landline phone business.  Fundamental changes do not always have to be caused by technological change, though.  It’s possible for a shift in regulation or business practices to dramatically change an industry, as well.

One important factor to remember when you are threatened by such changes is that the changes will only occur because someone wants something to happen differently.  It may not be your company, or your competitors who want to see change, but strategic changes, as a general rule, tend to happen because a customer or supplier group either chooses to meet their needs in a different

Strategies 18 tips and tricks for daily business life

Running a business means taking care of lots of little things. Sure, success depends on the big things, such as your strategy, marketing and technology. But sometimes, we could use a bit of guidance on how to better handle the little things to make our business lives easier.

Here are a few tips and tricks learned in my years of business:

  • Develop and practice your “elevator pitch,” a brief sentence to describe what your business is all about. Use it when you introduce yourself to others, at business mixers, meeting with prospects. You’re more likely to land a customer and get referrals if you can clearly describe what you do.
  • If you’re giving a customer or client a discount, let them know it! When you send the bill, be certain to indicate the regular price and then the voluntary discount you’re giving them. That reminds them they’re getting a special deal.
  • If you get more than 50% of your business from one customer or distribution channel, diversify. Don’t become overly dependent on one source for your long-term economic well-being.
  • Think of the long-term value of the customer, not just the one-time transaction. It’s almost always better to retain a happy customer than to make a

The 10 Best Business Travel Tips

A large part of my work as a business author is speaking and conducting workshops all over the world, which of course entails a good bit of

Tip #1: Stop the germs. Airplanes are cauldrons of bacteria and viruses, but with an ounce of prevention you can stop the germs cold (pardon the pun). You’ll need a small bottle of hand sanitizer and tube of Bacitracin. Sanitize your hands, then put a dab of Bacitracin on your finger tip and use it to coat the inside of one nostril. Repeat for the other nostril. Doctor-recommended, this wards off all the evil sick-makers.

 

Tip #2: Bring down the noise. Forget the expensive, noise-canceling, bulky headphones. Get some E-A-R soft foam disposable earplugs. There are five good reasons why these trump other solutions: they’re far cheaper, far less bulky (thus easier to pack), easy to replace, takeoff- and landing-friendly (non electronic), and you can actually sleep comfortably wearing them because you don’t have to wrangle big earmuffs.

 

Tip #3: Eat smart. Dan has four road rules for eating in airports. First, look for where the airline personnel—pilots, attendendnats, etc.—are eating, and follow their lead. Second, go for protein over carbs, because it takes longer to

7 Tips for Networking

Networking goes hand in hand with running a successful business.

But many of us dread walking into a room and introducing ourselves to a bunch of strangers.

I’ve been asked to share my best networking tips at a meeting today of the National Association of Women Business Owners in Philadelphia. Here are the most valuable tips I’ve come across – and put to work myself – over the years:

  1. Resist the urge to arrive late. It’s almost counter-intuitive, but showing up early at a networking event is a much better strategy than getting there on the later side. As a first attendee, you’ll notice that it’s calmer and quieter – and people won’t have settled into groups yet. It’s easier to find other people who don’t have conversation partners yet.
  2. Ask easy questions. Don’t wait around the edges of the room, waiting for someone to approach you. To get the conversation started, simply walk up to a person or a group, and say, “May I join you” or “What brings you to this event?” Don’t forget to listen intently to their replies. If you’re not a natural extrovert, you’re probably a very good listener – and listening can be an excellent way to

9 Helpful Tips for Business Blogging

It’s one thing to create a blog – it’s another to create a blog that readers want to visit again and again. If you’re serious about using blog hosting to meet your business goals, there are nine tips to follow when developing a business blogging strategy.

#1: Find a valuable niche

The ideal blog dares to be different. Find a neglected (or new) area of your industry that will appeal to your target audience. Ask yourself, “Will they want to read about this every day?” If the answer is “yes,” you have a great reason to create a blog.

#2: Enjoy yourself

Business blogging should never feel like a chore. When you create a blog because you’re interested in its topic, your readers will appreciate – and even reciprocate – your enthusiasm.

#3: Look at the big picture

While it’s only natural to focus on the products and services you offer, you can also benefit from broadening your scope. For example, if you create a blog for your pet toy store, your target audience may be interested in posts about pet health and nutrition, or even pet rescue programs. Stick with your overall business blogging theme, but explore diverse (yet related) topics.

#4: See what’s out there

Online

6 tips to help you make sure your business networking is FIT for purpose

The vast majority of people when networking have pleasant conversations, which lead precisely nowhere. It’s a big sweeping statement, but from my research for The Financial Times Guide to Business Networking, I found this to be true. This is the reason I devised The FITTER™ model. This is my own model which I have developed over the last few years and used to train professionals and business owners on how to network in a time efficient manner. This model gives you a simple mnemonic which, if applied to your networking activities, will enable you to network efficiently and effectively anywhere and anytime.

FITTER™ stands for:
Follow up: Your follow up is crucial to your networking success. After meeting new people, decide on whether they are an A, B or C-lister; send them a note after meeting them, connect with them on social networking sites and add them to your relationship management systems. Follow up is more than the ‘one cup of coffee’, it’s important to make sure that you build the relationship after the event, rather than just leaving them as a name in your LinkedIn connections or relationship management database.

Introduce yourself with impact: You never get another chance to make

Common Sense Business Tips

If you’re thinking of starting your own business, or even if you already are an entrepreneur, there are certain common sense business practices that apply to any industry.  Check out the following list to see how many you currently incorporate into yours.

  • Keep accurate records.  This includes not only records of transactions, but also receipts from purchases, invoices for services performed or products sold, and all tax documents.  You can choose to keep hard copies, electronic copies, or a combination of both.  However, don’t forget to have a backup somewhere for anything electronic.  The more accurate and organized your records are, the easier it will be to correct a problem if or when it arises.
  • Organize your desk/office.  Wherever your main workspace is, it should be well-kept area; a cluttered, disorganized area will inhibit your productivity.  Even worse, you may be unable to locate an important document or product you need when you actually need it.
  • Treat customers and employees/colleagues with respect.  You’re bound to encounter difficult situations involving the people with whom you do business.  The way you handle such issues speaks a lot about your character and business ethic.  Sometimes problems cannot be avoided, but handling them calmly, professionally, and respectfully

10 Tips for Balancing a Business Education and Work

Going back to school when you’re already working full-time in the business world can be daunting. The hours you used to spend unwinding are now devoted to learning new material and fulfilling the course requirements for a business education degree program. It’s easy to become overwhelmed, particularly when one of the first things to suffer when a person takes on so much responsibility can be self-care.

The following ten tips for going back to school are designed to help you achieve a comfortable balance between ongoing job performance and future career success.

1. Create a Schedule

You already know your work hours. Now it’s time to figure out how much time you can devote to study. Be realistic. If you are a morning person, setting the alarm for 5 a.m. makes sense; that quiet time is perfect for learning. Another person may prefer studying on weekend afternoons. Once you figure out when you will be learning, write it down – and follow through. Keeping a regular schedule is the best way to avoid stress and burnout.

2. Carve out Blocks of Free Time

It’s essential that you not only make time for yourself once a week, but also that you find some time to spend with your